The Global China Studies program is designed to produce an elite group of graduates who can conduct critical analysis of issues related to China in a global context. It provides students with multi/interdisciplinary training in the humanities and social science through an integrated track or a social science track after a shared first-year curriculum.
 
Students should follow on the tracks and complete ALL requirements as specified.

 

  • HUMA 1440 Modern China
  • HUMA 2590 The Making of the Modern World: Renaissance to the Present
  • SOSC 1350 Contemporary China: Continuity and Change
  • SOSC 2290 Understanding Globalization
  • SHSS 1010 First-year Seminar
  • NOTE: The above five courses are to be taken during first year.
  • SHSS 4991 Capstone Project
  • SHSS 4992 Honors Thesis
  • NOTE: SHSS 4991 or SHSS 4992; to be taken in final year.
  • LANG 2170 Chinese Communication Skills for Humanities and Social Science Studies
  • LANG 2070 English Communication Skills for Humanities and Social Science Studies I
  • LANG 3070 English Communication for Humanities and Social Science Studies II
  • LANG 4070 Academic Writing in Context — Global China Studies

  • HUMA 2400 Approaches to Humanities in China Studies
  • SOSC 2140 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Three 3000-level courses and three 4000-level courses must be taken from the lists, and in at least three of the following four areas.

    • SOSC 3120 Economic Development
    • SOSC 3150 Science, Technology and Environment
    • SOSC 4260 China’s Economic Transformation
    • SOSC 4280 China in the Global Political Economy
    • SOSC 4290 China’s Sustainable Development

    • HUMA 3630 Community and Cultural Identity
    • HUMA 3900 Philosophical Inquiry into the Modern World
    • HUMA 4610 Heritage in Cross-cultural Perspective
    • HUMA 4700 Confucianism in a Global Context

    • SOSC 3520 Understanding Comparative Politics
    • SOSC 3880 Social Inequality and Social Mobility
    • SOSC 4270 Social Change in Contemporary China
    • SOSC 4600 Understanding Chinese Politics

    • HUMA 3030 Language, Communication and Culture
    • HUMA 3200 Questions of Humanity in World Literature
    • HUMA 4020 Language and Literature in Modern China
    • HUMA 4220 Verbal and Visual Representation of China

  • Six courses and at least TWO of which must be at 3000-/4000-level.
  • NOTE: Students opting for SHSS 4991 are required to take a minimum total of 7 courses (21 credits) for Track Electives, in which 3 of them must be at 3000-/4000-level.

  • Students are required by the University to fulfill the common core requirements by taking courses in the following domains:  
    • Humanities
    • Social Analysis
    • Science and Technology
    • Quantitative Reasoning
    • English Communication
    • Chinese Communication
    • Healthy Lifestyle

  • Students may choose from the wide-ranging courses offered by any Schools (including the School of Business Administration, School of Engineering, School of Humanities and Social Science, and School of Science) and by the Interdisciplinary Programs Office. They may develop a Minor in another program with the credits earned from these courses.

 

  • HUMA 1440 Modern China
  • HUMA 2590 The Making of the Modern World: Renaissance to the Present
  • SOSC 1350 Contemporary China: Continuity and Change
  • SOSC 2290 Understanding Globalization
  • SHSS 1010 First-year Seminar
  • NOTE: The above five courses are to be taken during first year.
  • SHSS 4991 Capstone Project
  • SHSS 4992 Honors Thesis
  • NOTE: SHSS 4991 or SHSS 4992; to be taken in final year.
  • LANG 2170 Chinese Communication Skills for Humanities and Social Science Studies
  • LANG 2070 English Communication for Humanities and Social Science Studies I
  • LANG 3070 English Communication For Humanities and Social Science Studies II
  • LANG 4070 Academic Writing in Context — Global China Studies

  • SOSC 1100 Elementary Statistics for Social Research
  • SOSC 1300 The World of Politics
  • SOSC 1440 Introduction to Economics
  • SOSC 1850 Understanding Society
  • SOSC 2140 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Any TWO courses from two of the following three areas:
     
    SOSC 1110 Science, Technology and Society or SOSC 1130 Science, Technology and Business
     
    SOSC 1780 Population and Society or SOSC 1860 Population and Development in China
     
    SOSC 1960 Discovering Mind and Behavior or SOSC 1980 Psychology and Everyday Life

  • Seven courses from one of the two thematic areas below; of the seven courses at least four must be at the 3000-level or higher.
  • Area I: Economy, Politics, and Society

     
    SOSC 2130 Education and Society
    SOSC 2210 Social Psychology
    SOSC 2630 Development in Rural China
    SOSC 2740 Gender and Society
    SOSC 2960 Educational Psychology
    SOSC 2970 Abnormal Psychology
    SOSC 2980 Personality Psychology
    SOSC 3120 Economic Development
    SOSC 3410 East Asian Economic Development
    SOSC 4280 China in the Global Political Economy
    SOSC 5750 International Political Economy

  • Area II: Sustainability, Technology and Public Policy

     
    SOSC 2000D Environmental Politics
    SOSC 2010 Environmental and Society
    SOSC 2170 Environmental and Business: A Design Approach
    SOSC 2300 The Pearl River Delta Mega-City: Agglomeration, Integration, Multi-Polarity
    SOSC 2310 Introductory Environmental and Health Economics
    SOSC 3110 Innovation and Technology in Hong Kong
    SOSC 3150 Science, Technology and Environment
    SOSC 3260 Sustainability Science: Policy Problems and Perspectives
    SOSC 3600 Public Policy Analysis
    SOSC 4290 China’s Sustainable Development
    SOSC 4320 Policy Analysis and Design for Sustainable Development
    SOSC 5620 Sustainable Development
    SOSC 5780 Foundation in Public Policy
    SSMA 5140 Innovation and Society

  • Courses that can be counted as either Area I or Area II

     
    SOSC 2000E Community/ Social Service Project
    SOSC 2280 International Relations of East Asia
    SOSC 2780 Modernization and Social Change
    SOSC 3000G Introduction to Social Network Analysis
    SOSC 3130 Hong Kong Culture
    SOSC 3250 Gender and Development
    SOSC 3520 Understanding Comparative Politics
    SOSC 3530 Social Movements and Contentious Politics
    SOSC 3540 Environmental Psychology
    SOSC 3630 Democracy and Democratization around the World
    SOSC 3720 Introduction to Social Network Analysis
    SOSC 3880 Social Inequality and Social Mobility
    SOSC 4000A China in Comparative Perspective
    SOSC 4260 China’s Economic Transformation
    SOSC 4270 Social Change in Contemporary China
    SOSC 4310 Chinese Capitalism: Historical and Comparative Perspectives
    SOSC 4600 Understanding Chinese Politics
    SOSC 5130 Understanding Modern Society
    SOSC 5190 Analyzing International Relations: China and the US
    SOSC 5480 Issues in Contemporary Chinese Politics
    SOSC 5520 International Aspects of China’s Reforms
    SOSC 5660 Migration and Globalization
    SOSC 5680 Democracy and Democratization
    SOSC 5730 Comparative Social Stratification

  • Students are required by the University to fulfill the common core requirements by taking courses in the following domains:  
    • Humanities
    • Social Analysis
    • Science and Technology
    • Quantitative Reasoning
    • English Communication
    • Chinese Communication
    • Healthy Lifestyle

  • Students may choose from the wide-ranging courses offered by any Schools (including the School of Business Administration, School of Engineering, School of Humanities and Social Science, and School of Science) and by the Interdisciplinary Programs Office. They may develop a Minor in another program with the credits earned from these courses.

 

Remarks: To graduate from the University, students should complete at least 120 credits. Students may have to take courses beyond the ones summarized above to meet the requirement.

I took a total number of three courses in York University. The professors in York University always try to involve students in the discussion and encourage them to express their views and opinions in lesson. The students are all very attentive and they frequently give response to the professors as well as taking the initiative to ask questions. When I was studying in HKUST, I seldom took the initiative to express my views in class as I found that it was very embarrassing. Apart from the fruitful school life, I have also got a lot of chances to explore the city. Toronto is actually a very lovely city and it is often referred to as “the most multicultural city in the world”.

Hiuda LEE
York University, Canada
Exchange-out: Year 3

One of the biggest differences between HKUST and CUA in terms of courses are the varieties. As for me I don’t exactly have an equivalent major in CUA as in HKUST (which is Global China Studies), I have a greater flexibility in choosing courses. One of the most interesting course that I have chosen is Terrorism and Counterterrorism, which you can never easily find an institution that actually put emphasis on teaching students what terrorism is. The best part of this course is the instructor, who is an ex-FBI field agent specializing in counterterrorism office. 

Cody KUNG
The Catholic University of America, Washington D.C., USA
Exchange-out: Year 3

Sciences Po is one of the best universities in France which is famous for the field of political sciences. The learning atmosphere is quite tense when compared to HKUST, all the students pay full attention to the professors during the lessons. Parisians look cold, but I can always find love and caring here. I have fully experienced how the French living style and in to it during my stay in the Paris’s apartment. Paris is my favorite city in Europe. There are lots of previous memories in these four months. I have gained a lot for my exchange out program.

Joey NG
Sciences Po, Paris, France
Exchange-out: Year 3

The exchange life in Japan was valuable and unforgettable. During the period in Japan, I have experienced the difference between Japan Universities and Hong Kong Universities, especially in the learning environment. The most benefit point in living Japan is my Japanese level improved a lot during my stay in Japan. Since most Japanese could not speak fluent English in daily life, the social environment forces me to improve my Japanese level in order to communicate with Japanese and have a more pleasure life in Japan. I love Japanese cuisine culture a lot, especially Japanese sushi. To learn more things about sushi culture, I have tried to find different persons to teach me about the process to make sushi, operation issues related to sushi restaurants etc.

Darren YIP
Kyoto University, Japan
Exchange-out: Year 3

Being an exchange student in the University of Copenhagen is surely one of my most memorable experiences in my university life. I have taken three courses focusing on the study of Danish society, using sociological and cultural perspectives. I even learnt basic Danish. Talking about the methods of teaching in Denmark, basically it is the same as the one in Hong Kong. But more excursions are provided for students to gain first-hand experiences, so as to develop deeper insights on the subject. Apart from stressful school work, the local students often organise parties and gatherings, to mingling around and meet new people. They reminded me that performing well in academics does not necessarily mean to sacrifice social and family life.

Jamie TSE
University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Exchange-out: Year 3

The life in Erasmus University of Rotterdam (EUR) is fast-paced and hustle, but being an exchange student is never an excuse for me to slower my steps. In this new school, the arrangement of semester term represents the most different perspectives compared to HKUST. Instead of taking 5 courses in a row, as usual, EUR breaks down the semester into two blocks with 2 to 3 courses each block. This is a new tempo demanding the understanding as well as mastering the course material under a packed schedule. Never regretting my decision to exchange, I learnt to embrace my culture so as to present it confidently. What’s more important is the courage to explore the field I never been to.

Ricky PUN
Erasmus University of Rotterdam, Netherlands
Exchange-out: Year 3

Having an exchange study at Peking University is definitely a life-changing experience. I chose School of Law as my faculty there. I observed quite a lot of differences in learning between Peking University and HKUST. Most students there would prefer continuing their study in postgraduate level. Unlike Hong Kong, job market in Mainland China encourages freshmen to equip themselves in order to succeed in the career. Learning in Beijing is not restricted to classrooms. I developed my professional network in Mainland China by participating activities inside and outside university. Through personal observation and interaction with locals, I gained a better understanding on China’s economic landscape and culture deposits.

Rax TSANG
Peking University, China
Exchange-out: Year 3