Hao Dong appointed as Assistant Professor at Peking University

We are pleased to report that Lee-Campbell group member and PhD graduate Hao DONG has taken up a position as an Assistant Professor and Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Social Research, Guanghua School of Management, Peking University. Concurrently, he has been selected as a Boya Young Fellow (博雅青年学者). He is the first Boya Young Fellow to be appointed in humanities and social science at Peking University.

Hao plans to continue his comparative research on social inequality and family demography. For his studies, he makes use of such large-scale, longitudinal historical population administrative microdata as the Lee-Campbell group’s China Multigenerational Panel Databases as well as contemporary census and survey data.

Hao has eight peer-reviewed publications in English and four peer-reviewed publications in Chinese. His English-language work has appeared in Demography, Social Science and Medicine, Demographic Research, Evolution and Human Behavior, and IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics. His Chinese language work has appeared in 文史哲, 社会学研究, 历史研究, 社会.

Before joining Peking University, Hao was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China and Postdoctoral Affiliate at the Office of Population Research (OPR) and Department of Sociology, Princeton University. As a postdoc at Princeton he was supervised by Yu Xie and they continue to collaborate.

Hao earned his PhD in Social Science at HKUST in 2016, supervised by James Lee with support from Cameron Campbell. While a PhD student at HKUST he was supported by the Hong Kong Postgraduate Fellowship Scheme.

Hao Dong’s website: http://www.hdong.net/

Paper on ethnic intermarriage during the Qing by Lee-Campbell Group members

Lee-Campbell group student Bijia Chen, former student Hao Dong and Cameron Campbell recently published a paper in Demographic Research on ethnic intermarriage in Shuangcheng, Heilongjiang, during the late Qing:

https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol38/34/

This paper grew out of Bijia’s MPhil thesis. It uses registered ethnicity of males and inferred ethnicity of wives to examine marriage between Han, Manchu, and others within the Banner populations in Shuangcheng in the late 19th century. Wife’s ethnicity was inferred from her surname. The population is a useful one to study because the Han, Manchu and others who composed it were all part of the Banners, and marriages between them were not subject to rules that forbade or discouraged marriage between Banners and non-Banners. In other words, it is an opportunity to study boundaries between Manchu and Han in a setting where they were not subject to regulations on Banner/non-Banner marriage that would have had the side effect of making Manchu/Han marriage difficult in most other parts of China.

The analysis uses the CMGPD Shuangcheng database, which is available for download from ICPSR:

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/35292