Events & Seminars

Webinar
NUS-HKUST Global Webinar Series (July 15, 3-5 pm)

From social distancing to travel restrictions, the COVID-19 outbreak has had unprecedented impacts on our daily lives. The pandemic has certainly changed, and will continue to leave significant and lasting implications on, the evolving landscapes of public policy, trade relations, economic and social activities.  Join us for the last episode of the HKUST Global Webinar Series under the theme “Navigating a World of Disruption”, in partnership with National University of Singapore, to learn about the multifaceted impacts of COVID-19 on food security, climate change, air quality, global trade, trends in international migration, remittances and scholarship. Through the academic exchanges, we wish to better understand what are the changes and challenges that we have to face in the post-pandemic era. Register Now Registration closes on July 15 at 12:00 (GMT+8). [LIVE] "Adaption to Historical and Contemporary Disruptions" Date: July 15, 2020 (Wednesday) Time: 15:00 – 16:30 (GMT+8) Moderator and Opening Remarks: ·         Prof. Kellee TSAI, Dean of Humanities and Social Science, HKUST  Panelists: ·         Prof. Jenny SMITH, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities, HKUST “Food Security in an Age of Disruption" ·         Prof. David TAYLOR, Professor of Tropical Environmental Change, Department of Geography, NUS "Air Quality and the Impacts of Infectious Diseases - Some Lessons from the 1918 Influenza Pandemic" ·         Prof. Kevin TAM, Associate Professor, Division of Social Science, HKUST “Ramping up Climate Action: Challenges from a Behavioral Perspective” ·         Prof. Sooyeon KIM, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, NUS “The COVID-19 Pandemic and Disruptions in Global Trade” ·         Prof. Stuart GIETEL-BASTEN, Professor, Division of Social Science, HKUST “Impact of COVID-19 on International Migration and Remittances" ·         Prof. Itty ABRAHAM, Professor, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, NUS “Reflections on the Pandemic’s Impact on Scholarship”

Date
July 15, 2020 (Wednesday)
Time
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Venue
Online Registration
Language
English
Organizer
NUS and HKUST

MPhil Thesis Presentation
Listening Against Disappearance: Radio Aesthetics in 1950s Hong Kong (Wednesday 29 Jul 2020)

Abstract: Radio artefacts were indispensable for entertainment, information and control in the early Cold War. They were part and parcel of the urban soundscape; they cultivated a new listening subject and inspired many cross-media adaptations. Those evanescent voices and sounds, although not preserved, left indelible imprints on literature and film, and hence on the collective memory of generations of Hong Kong people. In order to open up the history of radio and its engagement in Hong Kong, this dissertation proposes interconnected frameworks for performing formal readings of radio aesthetics, digging into the transmedial trajectories of adaptations and mutual influence. Chapter One takes a close look at the political and technical concern behind the adoption of wired technology and how the transnational British enterprise Radio Rediffusion navigated around the contesting ideologies on the frontlines of the Cold War. Chapter Two presents the unique historical case of Lei Ngor, whose work and career at Rediffusion emerged out of the confluence between the craft of traditional storytelling and modern media technology. Chapter Three draws the historical contours of a peculiar genre “sky novel film”, offering new perspectives on the sonic dimension of early Cantonese cinema. Chapter Four explores how modern acoustical technology affected the structure and textuality of literature with a special focus on the USIS-commissioned works by Xu Xu and Eileen Chang. With close readings of individual program, cross-media adaptation and radio-inspired artwork, this dissertation not only provides a new account of the most flourishing form of cultural consumption in the mid-twentieth century but also presents a powerful argument for the central place of the aesthetics of sound in the history of modern experience.

Speaker(s)
Ms. Shu CHEN
Date
July 13, 2020 (Monday)
Time
10:00 am
Venue
Zoom Meeting: https://hkust.zoom.us/j/98849496617
Remarks
Meeting ID: 988 4949 6617

MPhil Thesis Presentation
Tradition Encountering Modernity: Zhang Junmai’s Neo-Confucianism (Friday 17 Jul 2020)

ABSTRACT Zhang Junmai (1887–1969) was a famous politician and philosopher of 20th-century China. For his advocacy of reviving Confucianism from 1923 to his death, his has normally been considered one of the great contributors to the promotion of traditional culture and creation of a neo-Confucian philosophy. However, though Zhang Junmai never became absent from researchers’ vision, a detailed exploration of his neo-Confucian philosophy has been lacking. This thesis is devoted to addressing the gap in the research and attempts to elaborate various spheres of Zhang Junmai’s neo-Confucian philosophy: metaphysics, moral philosophy, knowledge issues and political philosophy. As an overall evaluation of his philosophy, this thesis proposes two qualities of Zhang’s philosophical achievements (global-mindedness and interlinking of the physical and metaphysical worlds) and defends against the criticism that Zhang’s thought is pan-moralistic. We argue that what he inherited from traditional Confucianism was the belief that moral values have priority over other values, which does not entail the intrusion of morality on other cultural spheres. This is also the common ground he shared with other contemporary neo-Confucianists.

Speaker(s)
Ms. Yajun TANG
Date
July 13, 2020 (Monday)
Time
10:30 am
Venue
Zoom Meeting ID: https://hkust.zoom.us/j/98122114197
Language
English

Seminar
The Daodejing and Ecclesiastes on the Meaning of Life (Wednesday 27 May 2020)

Abstract: The current study is a comparative research on the Daodejing (道德經) and Ecclesiastes with the aim of answering the question of the meaning of life. The focus of the study is on the two texts especially the content related to the two terms xu (emptiness 虛)and hebel (vanity) in the Daodejing and Ecclesiastes respectively. It starts with a miniature demonstrating the framework of the current study based on the comparison of the two terms xu and hebel. It then follows by six chapters from the Xu and Hebel Comparison to the Meaning of Life Reflection. It finds that emptiness is the common ingredient of xu and hebel in Chapter 3. It suggests that Socrates is the hidden protagonist of Ecclesiastes in Chapter 4. It offers the possibility of seeing the trueness of one’s life through xu in Chapter 5. It discovers the similarities of the two texts which lie under their very different appearances and backgrounds in Chapter 6. It ends with the findings in Chapter 7 that one lives a harmonious life freely, truly and positively; works for the goodness of all people continuously with the objective of having all humans living peacefully and healthily in an ordered society as the final answer to the question of the meaning of life. The answer is based on the results of the previous chapters which are the process of analyzing and comparing the two texts. The answer ends the current research on the meaning of life through a comparative research on the Daodejing nd Ecclesiastes.

Speaker(s)
Ms. Hoi-shan CHONG
Date
May 27, 2020 (Wednesday)
Time
14:00
Venue
Zoom Meeting: https://hkust.zoom.us/j/97902392928
Language
English
Remarks
Meeting ID: 979 0239 2928

Research Seminar
Adult migrant language education: A social justice perspective (Monday 27 Apr 2020)

Abstract: In this presentation I examine the practices and policies relating to the language education provided for, and experienced by, adult migrants who are settling in English-dominant countries. Over the past two decades in the UK, the US and elsewhere in the English-dominant west, the English language has become central to debates and policies about migration, citizenship, nationality and belonging. English language education has thus become tightly linked to immigration and citizenship policy. With this in mind, I note two current concerns. First, language education for migrants as currently conceived – in policy circles and in established curricula – is associated with a powerful ideology of ‘one nation one language’. This monolingual stance disregards that people develop competence in English as part of a multilingual repertoire – and that language education practice has a role in in supporting their multilingualism. Second, bracketing language education with social integration betrays an understanding of integration as being primarily the responsibility of the newcomer, instead of recognising settlement and belonging as issues for everyone. Drawing on recent research in urban multilingualism, language education policy formation and studies of practice, I outline principles for an alternative social justice-informed approach to adult migrant language education, appropriate for conditions of mobility and times of change. Biography: James Simpson is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education, University of Leeds, UK. His research interests lie in the teaching and learning of English for Speakers of Other Languages, in migrant language learning and arts practice, and in the sociolinguistics of mobility. His work involves the critical analysis of linguistic practices relating to identity and belonging, language diversity, language pedagogy, language policy and literacy. His books include Translanguaging as Transformation (Multilingual Matters, 2020, edited with Emilee Moore and Jessica Bradley), Voices and Practices in Applied Linguistics (White Rose Press, 2019, edited with Clare Wright and Lou Harvey), Adult Language Education and Migration: Challenging Agendas in Policy and Practice (Routledge, 2015, edited with Anne Whiteside), The Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge, 2011), and ESOL: A Critical Guide (OUP, 2008, with Melanie Cooke). He manages the discussion forum ESOL-Research, and is Chair of MESH, a charity supporting adult migrant language education.

Speaker(s)
Dr. James SIMPSON,
Senior Lecturer, School of Education, University of Leeds
Date
April 27, 2020 (Monday)
Time
4:05 pm
Venue
The research seminar will be conducted via ZOOM
Language
English
Remarks
Meeting ID: 916 6185 1748