Events & Seminars

Seminar
145th Lecture -- Social Life of the Chinese Hui Muslim in Hong Kong in the Colonial Era [第一百四十五講] 港英時期香港回民的社會生活 (星期日 2019年9月29日)

摘要: 中國回民穆斯林,即信仰伊斯蘭教、長期保持者中國回族或回民身份認同的社群,一直在香港多樣性的穆斯林社群中扮演著重要的角色。不過,由於香港回民操廣東話,在社會大眾眼中其“能見度”和“可識別度”都不明顯。儘管如此,香港歷史上有不少行業的發展都與回民有關,例如清真飲食和古董珠寶行業。香港回民人口雖然沒有南亞、東南亞穆斯林多,但一直承辦著一所中學、兩所小學、兩所幼稚園,更有為數不少的香港社會精英來自于回民家庭。本講座以新近出版的香港回民史料入手,介紹香港主要的回民社團和組織,幫助社會大眾更加深入了解長期被忽略的香港回民社群的歷史。 講著簡介: 馬健雄,香港科技大學人文學部副教授,長期從事中國西南邊疆歷史與少數民文化研究,著有The Lahu Minority in Southwest China: A Response to Ethnic Marginalization on the Frontier (2013)、《再造的祖先:西南邊疆的族群動員與拉祜族的歷史建構》(2013)等。

Speaker(s)
馬健雄教授 Professor Jianxiong MA
Date
September 29, 2019 (Sunday)
Time
下午3:00-下午5:00
Venue
香港歷史博物館地下演講廳 Lecture Hall, G/F, Hong Kong Museum of History
Language
普通話主講 Putonghua
Organizer
協辦︰香港歷史博物館Hong Kong Museum of History
Remarks
免費參加; 先到先得,滿座即止 Free Admission; first come, first served

Seminar
Figurative Language and Technology in Early China (Monday 16 September 2019)

Abstract: Early China’s masters of philosophy frequently use metaphors and analogies to formulate their philosophical arguments. Often readers regard these as purely literary devices. In this seminar I will suggest a different approach and argue that figurative language in China belonged to the normal register of tools used to analyse and describe the world, including technical knowledge. I start from the premise that the technical (or “scientific”) and the philosophical (or moralistic and political) are not necessarily mutually exclusive and will show that metaphors are revealing not only for their symbolical or referential potential but also as a source of technical and social information. I will develop this argument using passages that deal with agriculture and agronomy in Warring States and early imperial texts. Biography: Roel Sterckx 胡司德 is Joseph Needham Professor of Chinese History, Science and Civilisation at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Clare College. He is the author and editor of several books including The Animal and the Daemon in Early China (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002); Of Tripod and Palate. Food, Politics and Religion in Traditional China (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2005); Food, Sacrifice, and Sagehood in Early China (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011); Animals through Chinese History. From Early Times to 1911 (with Dagmar Schäfer and Martina Siebert) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018); Chinese Thought. From Confucius to Cook Ding (London: Penguin 2019) and Ways of Heaven. An Introduction to Chinese Thought (New York: Basic Books, 2019). He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Trustee of the Needham Research Institute. Abstract: Early China’s masters of philosophy frequently use metaphors and analogies to formulate their philosophical arguments. Often readers regard these as purely literary devices. In this seminar I will suggest a different approach and argue that figurative language in China belonged to the normal register of tools used to analyse and describe the world, including technical knowledge. I start from the premise that the technical (or “scientific”) and the philosophical (or moralistic and political) are not necessarily mutually exclusive and will show that metaphors are revealing not only for their symbolical or referential potential but also as a source of technical and social information. I will develop this argument using passages that deal with agriculture and agronomy in Warring States and early imperial texts. Biography: Roel Sterckx 胡司德is Joseph Needham Professor of Chinese History, Science and Civilisation at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Clare College. He is the author and editor of several books including The Animal and the Daemon in Early China (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002); Of Tripod and Palate. Food, Politics and Religion in Traditional China (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2005); Food, Sacrifice, and Sagehood in Early China (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011); Animals through Chinese History. From Early Times to 1911 (with Dagmar Schäfer and Martina Siebert) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018); Chinese Thought. From Confucius to Cook Ding (London: Penguin 2019) and Ways of Heaven. An Introduction to Chinese Thought (New York: Basic Books, 2019). He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Trustee of the Needham Research Institute.

Speaker(s)
Professor Roel Sterckx, FBA (胡司德教授)
Joseph Needham Professor of Chinese History, Science and Civilization, The University of Cambridge and Fellow of Clara College
Date
September 16, 2019 (Monday)
Time
5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue
Library LG4 Multi-Function Room
Language
English
Sponsor
Co-organized by the HKUST Library

Seminar
Docent Training And Heritage Services Program in Yimtintsai Village, Saikung 西貢鹽田梓文物服務及導賞員培訓

Co-organizers: Yimtintsai Village Committee The Salt & Light Preservation Centre Limited South China Research Center, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Linked with HLTH 1010 Community or Voluntary Work   Introduction We aim to provide on-site training and drilling sessions to students at tertiary institutions for serving as docents and heritage facilitators in Yim Tin Tsai, a revitalized Hakka village, as experiential learning opportunities. 1. Information Session (Optional) Date: 5 / 6 Sept 2019 (Thursday and Friday, students can pick either one) Time: 16:00-17:00 Venue: LAU-6-214, Lau Ming Wai Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (5 Sept 2019) Rm 5501 (Lift 17-18) Academic Building, HKUST (6 Sept 2019) Instructors: David Ip, and Cheung Siu-woo 2. On-site training on Yim Tin Tsai Island (Mandatory) Date: 14 / 15 Sept 2019 (Saturday and Sunday, students can pick either one) Time: 08:45-12:30 Venue: Yim Tin Tsai Island Instructors: William Shek, David Ip, and Cheung Siu-woo 3. Drilling session on campus (Mandatory) Date: 17 / 18 Sept 2019 (Tuesday and Wednesday, students can pick either one) Time: 15:00-18:00 Venue: LAU-5-205, Lau Ming Wai Academic Building City University of Hong Kong (17 Sept 2019) LI-1100, Li Dak Sum Yip Yio Chin Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (18 Sept 2019) Instructors: David Ip, and Cheung Siu-woo

Date
September 5, 2019 (Thursday) - September 18, 2019 (Wednesday)

Seminar
Christianity Encountered Chinese Nationalism: Deviation of the Chinese YMCA from Its ‘Non-Interventionist Political Principle,’ 1895-1937 (Monday 2 Sep 2019)

Abstract: The Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) had historically pursued a ‘non-interventionist political principle’ that disallowed its city Associations from participation in partisan political struggles. This thesis argues that, between 1895 and 1937, the surge of nationalist feelings among the local leadership of the Chinese YMCA led the Association to deviate from this principle by prioritising engagement with the socio-political needs of the time. Ultimately, this accelerated the Association’s indigenisation in the ‘foreign soil of China.’ In the late nineteenth century, because of the ‘top-down missionary strategy’ adopted by the YMCA, native elites were recruited into the Association leadership to help expand its influence in China. Fervent nationalists themselves, many of these Chinese Christians had participated in anti-Qing revolutionary activities in the late 1900s and in the first decade of the twentieth century developed the politicised religious discourse of ‘Character, China’s Salvation’ (Ren’ge jiuguo 人格救國) to safeguard the country. Moreover, in 1924, they launched the Civic Education Campaign to promote Sun Yat-sen’s political ideas. During the Nanjing decade, to assist the Nationalist government in national reconstruction, the YMCA recycled and refashioned its philosophy of manhood as the spirit of the Officers’ Moral Endeavour Association and the New Life Movement. In 1935, the Chinese YMCA put forward that it stood for democracy against Communism, while it struggled to preserve itself in the precarious atmosphere of partisan conflicts and to fulfil its mission as both a character-building agency and a pro-democratic institution. When the YMCA leadership was convinced that staying socially relevant necessitated participation in politics, the Association’s deviation from its ‘non-interventionist political principle’ and the politicisation of Christianity became inevitable. This account highlights the role of Chinese Christians in the development of the YMCA in China, along with the interplay of religious culture and political society; both are themes inadequately explored to date.

Speaker(s)
Ms. Cecilia Cheuk-chi CHUNG
Date
September 2, 2019 (Monday)
Time
2:30pm
Venue
Room 3006, Academic Building (Lift 4)
Language
English

Public Lecture, Humanities
144th Lecture -- Language and Nation Building: Language Planning and Policy in Modern China [第一百四十四講] 語言與國家建構:現代中國語言規劃與政策 (Sunday 25 Aug 2019)

Bio: Cathy Ping PAN is Lecturer in the Division of Humanities, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She received her PhD degree in applied English linguistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and continued there as Postdoctoral Fellow before joining HKUST. Her areas of interest include intercultural pragmatics, linguistic politeness, language and intercultural communication, and second language writing. Abstract: The 20th century witnessed the rise of China as a modern nation-state after tremendous political upheaval and social change. As a civilization with a vast history, huge population, and massive diversity in climate, landscape and languages, language management in China has presented a thorny challenge for intellectuals, academics and policy makers in the post-imperial era. While considered traditionally as a distinctive endowment of humans, language, however, has engendered different attitudes and orientations. Some tend to embrace a utilitarian perspective, viewing language more as a practical tool to achieve communication efficiency, whereas for others, language serves a pillar of group allegiances and marker of ethnonational identity. This ideological view of language was originally espoused by German philosophers such as Johann Herder, Johann Fichte, Wilhelm von Humboldt in the 18th century whose ideas are believed to have exerted profound influence on the development of nationalism and nationalist movements in Europe. Specifically, for them, language is the spiritual treasure house of a nation or culture, embodying the essence or soul (Volksgeist) of the nation. With reference to China at the turn of the 20th century, what kind of role did language play in the establishment of the nation-state after the overthrown of the imperial Qing dynasty? Which line of thought, utilitarian or ideological view, underpinned the language planning and reform at the time? What is the language policy like in contemporary China and how can we understand the language planning and policy (LPP) processes in relation to the historical, political and social background of the nation? Guided by these questions, in this talk we will delve into the LPP issues in modern China, and probe the inextricable interplay between the value of language, nation-building and identity.

Speaker(s)
Dr. Cathy P PAN 潘萍博士
Date
August 25, 2019 (Sunday)
Time
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Venue
Lecture Hall, G/F, Hong Kong Museum of History
Language
English
Sponsor
Hong Kong Museum of History
Remarks
Free Admission; first come, first served