Being an exchange student in the University of Copenhagen is surely one of my most memorable experiences in my university life. I have taken three courses focusing on the study of Danish society, using sociological and cultural perspectives. I even learnt basic Danish. Talking about the methods of teaching in Denmark, basically it is the same as the one in Hong Kong. But more excursions are provided for students to gain first-hand experiences, so as to develop deeper insights on the subject. Apart from stressful school work, the local students often organise parties and gatherings, to mingling around and meet new people. They reminded me that performing well in academics does not necessarily mean to sacrifice social and family life.

Jamie TSE
University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Exchange-out: Year 3

In terms of the HKUST Global China Studies major, Global China Studies has two operational meanings. At the broadest, most common-sense level, it simply means China Studies from a global comparative perspective. At the narrower disciplinary and curricular levels, however, Global China Studies refers to the identification and study of global development and its interactions with local development in a Chinese context.

It is the decision of the University Senate that a BSc degree is appropriate for the program Global China Studies: Humanities and Social Science Perspective in the context of the founding mission of the university. Academically speaking, a BSc degree also reflects the balanced curriculum of Global China Studies, which provides not only a broad-based liberal arts education but also training in quantitative and scientific methodologies.

Yes. A student may make use of the free elective credits, as well as the thesis/project option, to develop a specialization in one or two disciplines or fields within the major, which will facilitate his or her pursuit of postgraduate study. The program’s intensive advising and mentoring system will help students work out the study paths suitable for their intellectual and professional needs.

Once admitted to the program, each student is assigned to one faculty member who will serve as his or her mentor during the first year of study. Students may meet with their faculty mentors for intellectual guidance, personal inspiration and career development advice. On top of this, the Program Director will provide program-specific advice to students on a regular basis from the time of admission to graduation. For general assistance, students may contact our staff in charge of the GCS major.

Our curriculum has ample built-in free elective credits for students to pursue a minor or even second major in other programs, provided that such programs are offered by other schools or departments.

We look at students’ academic results generally, with a greater emphasis on English. For DSE, we consider English + any 5 Core/ Elective subjects, and give double weight to English, 1.5 weight to Chinese. Students must meet the threshold of university entrance requirements to be eligible. Students who put our program in Band A will be given a bonus point. We suggest students put us in Band A throughout if they are truly interested in us. (*Admissions information is subject to change.)

No, our program requires no prior knowledge of humanities or social science subjects. Admission is based on students’ general intellectual competence and their commitment to this program.

The local intake number is around 48 every year, in addition to the non-local intake, which is about 20% of the total intake.

Yes, they may apply to either exam via JUPAS (based on their scores on the A-Level exam or the DSE exam) or via Direct Entry but NOT both. There is no fixed quota for Direct Entry into our program – much depends on the academic quality of the applicants but the quota is relatively small.