CMGPD Training Guide Video: Strengths and Weaknesses of the CMGPD-LN

I recorded another narration from the CMGPD Training Guide. This one is for the section that discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the CMGPD-LN. The discussion of strengths focuses on features of the CMGPD-LN that make it unique among sources for the study of historical demography. The discussion of weaknesses highlights some areas where caution needs to be exercised when carrying out analysis. Visitors in China may find it more convenient to view the video that I uploaded at Tudou.

Other videos will be available at the Youtube playlist devoted to CMGPD Training Guide videos.

Summer 2014 China Multigenerational Panel Dataset Workshop at SJTU (English announcement)

The 4th China Multigenerational Panel Dataset Workshop
Shanghai Jiaotong University, Minhang Campus
Shanghai, China

July 14-25, 2014

中文版

The Center for the History and Society of Northeast China at the Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Humanities will hold its 4th summer China Multigenerational Panel Data workshop from July 14 to July 25.

The workshop will focus on introducing the China Multigenerational Panel Datasets (CMGPD) as sources for the study of demography, stratification, and social and family history. These include the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN) and the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC).  The CMGPD have been released via the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Science Research.  The latest versions of the CMGPD document are available for download.

The CMGPD datasets have many unique features that make them useful not only for the study of Chinese population, social, and family history, but for the study of demographic, social and economic processes more generally.  Their features also make them useful as testbeds for researchers developing novel quantitative techniques.  The datasets are longitudinal, multi-generational, and structured at multiple levels, including the individual, the household, the kin group, the community, the administrative unit, and the region.

UCLA Professor of Sociology Cameron Campbell will be the primary lecturer. Guest lecturers will include Distinguished Professor and Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology James Lee; Yuxue Ren, Professor of History at Shanghai Jiaotong University; and Dong Hao, PhD student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

This class is intended to 1) introduce researchers to the CMGPD datasets and help them decide whether they may be useful in their own studies, 2) give current users an opportunity to learn more about the origin and context of the data, and 3) give participants basic instruction in the use of STATA to describe, organize and analyze the data.   Researchers who have already started using the CMGPD-SC or CMGPD-LN are welcome to attend and take advantage of the opportunity to discuss any questions they may have with Lee, Campbell, and others who were involved in the creation of the dataset.

Lectures and discussion will focus on 1) the historical, social, economic and institutional context of the populations covered by the data, 2) key features of the data, and 3) potential applications.  There will be optional sessions to introduce the Training Guide and demonstrate basic procedures for downloading the data from the website and loading it into STATA.

Please note that while there will be basic instruction in the use of STATA to organize and analyze the data, this is not intended as a class in STATA, or introductory statistics. Students looking specifically for instruction in STATA, statistics, or data management are encouraged to look elsewhere. Again, the class is intended for participants who want to assess whether CMGPD is suitable for their research interests, or are already considering the use of the CMGPD and seek basic instruction in the use of STATA to manipulate and analyze it.

The workshop will include daily exercises to introduce key features of the data, and STATA techniques for taking advantage of these features. Participants will also complete a small project of their own design using the data and present it on the last day of the workshop.

If any non-Chinese speakers enroll, the lectures will be in English.  If the participants all speak Chinese, lectures may be in Chinese, or a mixture of English and Chinese.  Discussion will be in English and Chinese.

The Shanghai Jiaotong University Center for the History and Society of Northeast China was established as a research unit by a collaboration of the Shanghai Jiaotong University (SJTU) School of the Humanities and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) School of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Datasets

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN)

The CMGPD-LN is an important dataset for the study of China’s family, social and demographic history, and for the study of demography and stratification more generally. The dataset is suitable for application of a wide variety of statistical techniques that are commonly used in social demography for the analysis of longitudinal, individual-level data, and available in the most popular statistical software packages. The dataset is distinguished by its size, temporal depth, and richness of detail on family, household and kinship context.

The materials from which the dataset was constructed are Shengjing Imperial Household Agency household registers held in the Liaoning Provincial Archives. The registers are triennial. Altogether there are 3600 of them. We transcribed a subset of them to produce the CMGPD-LN, which spans 160 years from 1749 to 1909. At present, the dataset comprises 29 register series, and consists of 1,500,000 records that describe 260000 individuals over seven generations. The CMGPD-LN is accordingly an important resource for the study of historical demography, sociology, economics, and other fields.

The CMGPD-LN and associated English-language documentation are already available for download at ICPSR.

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC)

The CMGPD-SC covers communities of recent settlers in Shuangcheng, Heilongjiang in the last half of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth. It contains 1.35 million records that describe 100,000 people. The registers cover descendants of urban migrants from Beijing and rural migrants from neighboring areas in northeast China who came to the area in the first half of the nineteenth century as part of a government organized effort to settle this largely vacant frontier region. One of the distinguishing features of this dataset is the availability of linked, individual-level landholding records for several points in time. The data also include a rich array of other indicators of household and family context and socioeconomic status.

Pending release of the CMGPD-SC through ICPSR, the data are available for download here.

Information

Dates
Monday, July 14, 2014 to Friday, July 25, 2014

Location
Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Humanities (SJTU Minhang Campus, Shanghai)

Application deadline
May 1, 2014

See link below to download application

Application procedure

Please send your personal statement, curriculum vitae, and application form (English or 中文) as attachments to chinanortheast@gmail.com.

Applications from faculty, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students are welcome. Applications from graduating college seniors will also be considered if they have already been accepted into a graduate program beginning fall 2014.  In that case, the application should include a copy of their graduate school acceptance. Any other interested parties should contact our staff at chinanortheast@gmail.com before applying to see if they will be considered.

Participants should be able to speak or read Chinese or English.  No prior experience in statistics, demography, or Chinese history is required.  Applicants must explain the reasons for their interest in the data in their application, and should demonstrate that they have background, experience or interests that in some way are relevant.

Participants who are Chinese nationals will have accommodations. Participants who are not Chinese nationals will receive assistance with arranging accommodations, and will receive a housing subsidy to help offset their costs. Participants who want other accommodations will have to arrange them on their own and will be responsible for all associated costs.

Participants should bring their own computer.

Students are responsible for all travel and local expenses, health care expenses, and other incidentals. Participants coming from abroad are strongly encouraged to confirm that their health insurance offers international coverage, or purchase travel health insurance.

Participants who are not Chinese nationals will need to obtain visas. We will issue invitation letters to facilitate the visa application. We strongly urge that accepted participants who need visas begin the application process as soon as possible after they are notified of their acceptance.

At present we expect to be able to accommodate 25-30 participants.

Links

Required Reading

Read the following before the workshop begins.  The highest priority are the specified pages in in the CMGPD-LN and CMGPD-SC User Guides.

Documentation

The documentation below is available here.

  • CMGPD-LN User Guide.  English pages 1-54, 90-96 or Chinese pages 13-64, 96-101.  Skim the descriptions of variables to look for ones that may be relevant to your research.
  • CMGPD-SC User Guide.  English pages 1-47. Again, skim the descriptions of variables to look for ones that may be relevant to your research.
  • CMGPD Training Guide. Pay particular attention to the sections at the beginning that introduce the data and highlight its distinctive characteristics.

Research Articles

  • Campbell, Cameron and James Lee. 2002 (publ. 2006). “State views and local views of population: Linking and comparing genealogies and household registers in Liaoning, 1749-1909.” History and Computing. 14(1+2):9-29.  http://papers.ccpr.ucla.edu/papers/PWP-CCPR-2004-025/PWP-CCPR-2004-025.pdf
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.  Appendix A.
  • Campbell, Cameron and James Z. Lee. 2011. “Kinship and the Long-Term Persistence of Inequality in Liaoning, China, 1749-2005.” Chinese Sociological Review. 44(1):71-104.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23596557

Review Articles

  • 康文林 (Cameron Campbell).  2012.  “历史人口学 (Historical Demography).”  Chapter 8 in 梁在编 (Zai Liang ed.) 人口学 (Demography).   北京:人民大学出版社 (Beijing: Renmin University Press), 233-265.

Select one or two of the following research articles based on your own interests (or another published article that uses the CMGPD), and read before the workshop starts

  • CHEN Shuang, James Lee, and Cameron Campbell. 2010. “Wealth stratification and reproduction in Northeast China, 1866-1907.” History of the Family. 15:386-412.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21127716
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.  Chapter 10.
  • Wang Feng, Cameron Campbell, and James Z. Lee. 2010. “Agency, Hierarchies, and Reproduction in Northeastern China, 1789 to 1840.” Chapter 11 in Noriko Tsuya, Wang Feng, George Alter, James Z. Lee et al. Prudence and Pressure: Reproduction and Human Agency in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press, 287-316.
  • Chen Shuang, Cameron Campbell, and James Z. Lee.  Forthcoming.  “Categorical Inequality and Gender Difference: Marriage and Remarriage in Northeast China, 1749-1912.”  Chapter 11 in Lundh, Christer, Satomi Kurosu, et al. Similarity in Difference.

Software

If you are not familiar with STATA, prepare for the workshop by reviewing as many of the materials for learning and using STATA at UCLA IDRE as possible. You are also strongly encouraged to watch video tutorials at the STATA website. Ideally, by the time you arrive at the workshop, you should already be able to  carry out very basic operations in STATA such as loading and saving files, creating tabulations and so forth. Do try to download the CMGPD-SC or CMGPD-LN and make sure you know how to load them and carry out very simple operations.

Recommended Reading

  • As much of the User Guides and Training Guide as you can.
  • 定宜庄, 郭松义, 李中清, 康文林. 2004. 辽东移民中的旗人社会.  上海:上海社会科学出版社.
  • Lee, James and Cameron Campbell. 1997. Fate and Fortune in Rural China: Social Organization and Population Behavior in Liaoning, 1774-1873. Cambridge University Press.
  • 李中清,王丰.  2000.  人类的四分之一: 马尔萨斯的神话与中国的现实:1700-2000。  三联·哈佛燕京学术丛书。(English: Lee, James and Wang Feng.  1999.  One Quarter of Humanity: Malthusian Mythology and Chinese Reality, 1700-2000.)
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.

Tentative Schedule (at Onedrive)

Acknowledgements

Preparation of the CMGPD-LN and accompanying documentation for public release via ICPSR DSDR was supported by NICHD R01 HD057175-01A1 “Multi-Generation Family and Life History Panel Dataset” with funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Preparation of the CMGPD-SC and accompanying documentation for public release via ICPSR DSDR was supported by NICHHD R01 HD070985-01 “Multi-generational Demographic and Landholding Data: CMGPD-SC Public Release.”

The CMGPD summer workshops in Shanghai have been supported by Shanghai Jiaotong University, the School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Center for the Society and History of Northeast China.  We are also grateful to staff at a variety of campus units at SJTU for their logistical support.

First publication using the CMGPD-LN public release!

Congratulations to Wang Lei at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’ Institute of Labor and Population Economics!  Wang Lei has just published what we believe is the first publication using the public release of the CMGPD-LN that doesn’t have one of us as a co-author: http://www.cnki.com.cn/Article/CJFDTotal-RKJJ201302006.htm The paper is a study of bachelorhood in northeast China in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, taking advantage of the excellent data on marital status available in the CMGPD-LN. It appeared in 人口与经济 (Population and Economics), which is one of China’s major social science journals.

We all expect that this will be just the first of many publications by others that make use the CMGPD-LN.

Here is the full citation for anyone who is interested:

Wang Lei.  2013.  清代辽东旗人社会中的男性失婚问题研究-基于中国多世代人口数据库—辽宁部分( CMGPD-LN) (A Study of Males’ Out-of-marriage in Bannerman Society of East Liaoning in Qing Dynasty: Based on CMGPD-LN).  人口与经济 (Population and Economics).  2013(2):35-43.

And for anyone who is interested, here is a paper we published on male marriage, which Wang Lei was kind enough to cite: http://sjeas.skku.edu/upload/200905/17-42JamesLee-1.pdf

 

Summer 2013 China Multigenerational Panel Dataset Workshop at SJTU (English announcement)

Summer 2013 China Multigenerational Panel Dataset Workshop
Shanghai Jiaotong University
Minhang Campus
Shanghai, China

July 15-19, 2013

中文版

The Center for the History and Society of Northeast China at the Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Humanities will hold its third summer China Multigenerational Panel Data workshop from July 15 to July 19.

The workshop will focus on introducing the China Multigenerational Panel Datasets (CMGPD) as sources for the study of demography, stratification, and social and family history. These include the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN) and the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC).  The CMGPD-LN has already been released via the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Science Research.  Data and documentation are already available for download: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/CMGPD/. Chinese language documentation for the CMGPD-LN are available for download here.  Draft documentation for the CMGPD-SC are available for download here.

The CMGPD datasets have many unique features that make them useful not only for the study of Chinese population, social, and family history, but for the study of demographic, social and economic processes more generally.  Their features also make them useful as testbeds for researchers developing novel quantitative techniques.  The datasets are longitudinal, multi-generational, and structured at multiple levels, including the individual, the household, the kin group, the community, the administrative unit, and the region.

UCLA Professor of Sociology Cameron Campbell and Distinguished Professor and Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology James Lee will be primary lecturers.  Guest lecturers will include Yuxue Ren, Professor of History at Shanghai Jiaotong University; and Dong Hao, PhD student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

This class is intended to 1) introduce researchers to the CMGPD datasets and help them decide whether they may be useful in their own studies, and 2) give current users an opportunity to learn more about the origin and context of the data.   Researchers who have already started using the CMGPD-SC or CMGPD-LN are welcome to attend and take advantage of the opportunity to discuss any questions they may have with Lee, Campbell, and others who were involved in the creation of the dataset.

Lectures and discussion will focus on 1) the historical, social, economic and institutional context of the populations covered by the data, 2) key features of the data, and 3) potential applications.  Because we have already released a Training Guide that provides instruction on carrying out basic and advanced analysis with the data, this year’s workshop will not provide instruction in STATA, or have computer exercises.  There will be optional sessions to introduce the Training Guide and demonstrate basic procedures for downloading the data from the website and loading it into STATA.

At the end of the week, participants will be asked to make a brief presentation on their ideas for making use of the data.  If participants are already working with the CMGPD, they will be welcome to make brief presentations on their work with it.  There will not be any computer exercises.

If any non-Chinese speakers enroll, the lectures will be in English.  If the participants all speak Chinese, lectures may be in Chinese.  Discussion will be in English and Chinese.

The Shanghai Jiaotong University Center for the History and Society of Northeast China was established as a research unit by a collaboration of the Shanghai Jiaotong University (SJTU) School of the Humanities and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) School of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Datasets

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN)

The CMGPD-LN is an important dataset for the study of China’s family, social and demographic history, and for the study of demography and stratification more generally. The dataset is suitable for application of a wide variety of statistical techniques that are commonly used in social demography for the analysis of longitudinal, individual-level data, and available in the most popular statistical software packages. The dataset is distinguished by its size, temporal depth, and richness of detail on family, household and kinship context.

The materials from which the dataset was constructed are Shengjing Imperial Household Agency household registers held in the Liaoning Provincial Archives. The registers are triennial. Altogether there are 3600 of them. We transcribed a subset of them to produce the CMGPD-LN, which spans 160 years from 1749 to 1909. At present, the dataset comprises 29 register series, and consists of 1,500,000 records that describe 260000 individuals over seven generations. The CMGPD-LN is accordingly an important resource for the study of historical demography, sociology, economics, and other fields.

The CMGPD-LN and associated English-language documentation are already available for download at ICPSR, following a free registration. Please visit the website: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/cmgpd

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC)

The CMGPD-SC covers communities of recent settlers in Shuangcheng, Heilongjiang in the last half of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth. It contains 1.35 million records that describe 100,000 people. The registers cover descendants of urban migrants from Beijing and rural migrants from neighboring areas in northeast China who came to the area in the first half of the nineteenth century as part of a government organized effort to settle this largely vacant frontier region. One of the distinguishing features of this dataset is the availability of linked, individual-level landholding records for several points in time. The data also include a rich array of other indicators of household and family context and socioeconomic status. We anticipate formal public release of the dataset via ICPSR in 2013 or 2014. We will provide participants in the summer class with access to drafts of the release and documentation.

Information

Dates

Monday, July 15, 2013 to Friday, July 19, 2013

Location
Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Humanities (SJTU Minhang Campus, Shanghai)
Application deadline

May 25, 2013

See link below to download application

Application procedure

Please send your personal statement, curriculum vitae, and application form as attachments to chinanortheast@gmail.com.  We will have an English language application form available soon.

Applications from faculty, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students are welcome. Applications from graduating college seniors will also be considered if they have already been accepted into a graduate program beginning fall 2013.  In that case, the application should include a copy of their graduate school acceptance. Any other interested parties should contact our staff at chinanortheast@gmail.com before applying to see if they will be considered.

Participants should be able to speak or read Chinese or English.  No prior experience in statistics, demography, or Chinese history is required.  Applicants must explain the reasons for their interest in the data in their application, and should demonstrate that they have background, experience or interests that in some way are relevant.

Participants will be offered free housing in graduate student dormitories at SJTU.  Participants who want other accommodations will have to arrange them on their own and will be responsible for all associated costs.  Participants should bring their own computer.  Students are responsible for travel and local expenses.  At present we expect to be able to accommodate 25-30 participants.

Links

Required Reading

Please complete as much of the required reading as possible before the workshop begins.  The highest priority are the assigned readings in the CMGPD-LN and CMGPD-SC User Guides.  Once these are complete

Documentation

  • CMGPD-LN User Guide.  English pages 1-54, 90-96 or Chinese pages 13-64, 96-101.  Skim the descriptions of variables to look for ones that may be relevant to your research.
  • CMGPD-SC User Guide.  English pages 1-47.
  • CMGPD Training Guide.  Please review slides 1-40.  Users who have experience or training in statistics should skim the remainder of the training guide and review the examples of the use of the guide.

Research Articles

  • Campbell, Cameron and James Lee. 2002 (publ. 2006). “State views and local views of population: Linking and comparing genealogies and household registers in Liaoning, 1749-1909.” History and Computing. 14(1+2):9-29.  http://papers.ccpr.ucla.edu/papers/PWP-CCPR-2004-025/PWP-CCPR-2004-025.pdf
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.  Appendix A.
  • Campbell, Cameron and James Z. Lee. 2011. “Kinship and the Long-Term Persistence of Inequality in Liaoning, China, 1749-2005.” Chinese Sociological Review. 44(1):71-104.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23596557

Review Articles

  • 康文林 (Cameron Campbell).  2012.  “历史人口学 (Historical Demography).”  Chapter 8 in 梁在编 (Zai Liang ed.) 人口学 (Demography).   北京:人民大学出版社 (Beijing: Renmin University Press), 233-265.

Select one or two of the following research articles based on your own interests (or another published article that uses the CMGPD), and read before the workshop starts

  • CHEN Shuang, James Lee, and Cameron Campbell. 2010. “Wealth stratification and reproduction in Northeast China, 1866-1907.” History of the Family. 15:386-412.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21127716
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.  Chapter 10.
  • Wang Feng, Cameron Campbell, and James Z. Lee. 2010. “Agency, Hierarchies, and Reproduction in Northeastern China, 1789 to 1840.” Chapter 11 in Noriko Tsuya, Wang Feng, George Alter, James Z. Lee et al. Prudence and Pressure: Reproduction and Human Agency in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press, 287-316.
  • Chen Shuang, Cameron Campbell, and James Z. Lee.  Forthcoming.  “Categorical Inequality and Gender Difference: Marriage and Remarriage in Northeast China, 1749-1912.”  Chapter 11 in Lundh, Christer, Satomi Kurosu, et al. Similarity in Difference.

Recommended Reading

  • As much of the User Guides and Training Guide as you can.
  • 定宜庄, 郭松义, 李中清, 康文林. 2004. 辽东移民中的旗人社会.  上海:上海社会科学出版社.
  • Lee, James and Cameron Campbell. 1997. Fate and Fortune in Rural China: Social Organization and Population Behavior in Liaoning, 1774-1873. Cambridge University Press.
  • 李中清,王丰.  2000.  人类的四分之一: 马尔萨斯的神话与中国的现实:1700-2000。  三联·哈佛燕京学术丛书。(English: Lee, James and Wang Feng.  1999.  One Quarter of Humanity: Malthusian Mythology and Chinese Reality, 1700-2000.)
  • Bengtsson, Tommy, Cameron Campbell, James Lee, et al. 2004.  Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. MIT Press.  Published in Chinese as 托米·本特森,康文林,李中清等. 2008. 压力下的生活:1700~1900年欧洲与亚洲的死亡率和生活水平. 北京: 社会科学文献出版社. Translated by 李霞 and 李恭忠.

Tentative schedule

Acknowledgements

Preparation of the CMGPD-LN and accompanying documentation for public release via ICPSR DSDR was supported by NICHD R01 HD057175-01A1 “Multi-Generation Family and Life History Panel Dataset” with funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Preparation of the CMGPD-SC and accompanying documentation for public release via ICPSR DSDR was supported by NICHHD R01 HD070985-01 “Multi-generational Demographic and Landholding Data: CMGPD-SC Public Release.”

The CMGPD summer workshops in Shanghai have been supported by Shanghai Jiaotong University, the School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Center for the Society and History of Northeast China.  We are also grateful to staff at a variety of campus units at SJTU for their logistical support.

 

Slides introducing use of STATA to organize and analyze CMGPD-LN data

 

UPDATE: This post is out of date. The most recent CMGPD-LN Documentation is available at the ICPSR study site: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/DSDR/studies/27063. The slides referred to here have been added to the Training Guide available there (2016 October 18).

I have posted the slides from my methodological lectures at the CMGPD short course that I taught in July at Shanghai Jiaotong University.  These slides introduce many of the STATA operations necessary to carry out advanced operations with the data, most importantly using bysort, merge and certain other commands to construct complex household, life course and kinship variables.  The slides also introduce the basic ‘pre-packaged’ outcome variables and the social status variables.  They also provide examples of using STATA to produce descriptive tables and figures using the data.

http://www.soc.ucla.edu/faculty/campbell/Outgoing/SJTU_CMGPD_2012_Methodological_Slides.zip

Please let me know if you have any comments or suggestions.  The slides are in essence a draft of the Training Guide that we will release soon.

2012 China Multigenerational Panel Data Summer Class

China Multigenerational Panel Data (CMGPD) 2012 Summer Training Workshop

Institute on the History and Society of Northeast China
School of the Humanities
Shanghai Jiaotong University
Shanghai, China

July 6, 2012 – July 20, 2012

Subject to revision.  Please check back on a regular basis for changes.

POLICIES

  • Attendance at all lectures and recitation sections is required.  Unexcused absences may be grounds for immediate dismissal.
  • Completion of all assignments is required.
  • Participants must bring their own laptop, and have STATA installed and the CMGPD-LN downloaded at the beginning of class.
  • If you already have experience working with a statistical package other than STATA, you may use it instead of STATA.  However, we may not be able to provide much assistance if you have difficulties.
  • Lectures will be in English.  The teaching assistants and I all speak Chinese, however.


REQUIRED READING

Please read the following BEFORE class begins

RECOMMENDED READING

These may be useful for participants who have less prior experience in demography, STATA, and other elements of the class.


DETAILED SCHEDULE 
(Links to shared spreadsheet with topics, assignments and readings by day)

Lectures will be in the morning. The substantive lectures will be 9:00am-10:30am. The data and methods lectures will be at 11:45am-12:15pm. Recitation will start at 1:30pm.

Summer 2012 China Multigenerational Panel Dataset class at SJTU (English announcement)

The Shanghai Jiaotong University Center for the History and Society of Northeast China was established as a research unit by a collaboration of the Shanghai Jiaotong University (SJTU) School of the Humanities and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) School of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Center’s second summer school will be held from July 6 to July 20. The class will focus on the use of the China Multigenerational Panel Datasets – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN) in the study demography, stratification, and social and family history. It will also preview a new dataset, the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC) that we plan to release in 2013. HKUST Distinguished Professor and Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences advises on the organization and content course. UCLA Professor of Sociology Cameron Campbell will lecture.  If any non-Chinese speakers enroll, the lectures will be in English, otherwise lectures may be in Chinese.

These datasets are complex in many ways: longitudinal, multi-generational, and structured at multiple levels, including the individual, the household, the kin group, the community, the administrative unit, and the region.  Fully exploiting the potential offered by these data requires application of sophisticated techniques in STATA or other statistical packages to manage the data, create variables, and carry out analysis.

This class is intended to introduce students to advanced techniques required to manage and analyse the CMGPD datasets, thereby equipping them to make use of the CMGPD-LN and CMGPD-SC in their own research.

Datasets

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Liaoning (CMGPD-LN)

The CMGPD-LN is an important dataset for the study of China’s family, social and demographic history, and for the study of demography and stratification more generally. The dataset is suitable for application of a wide variety of statistical techniques that are commonly used in social demography for the analysis of longitudinal, individual-level data, and available in the most popular statistical software packages. The dataset is distinguished by its size, temporal depth, and richness of detail on family, household and kinship context.

The materials from which the dataset was constructed are Shengjing Imperial Household Agency household registers held in the Liaoning Provincial Archives. The registers are triennial. Altogether there are 3600 of them. We transcribed a subset of them to produce the CMGPD-LN, which spans 160 years from 1749 to 1909. At present, the dataset comprises 29 register series, and consists of 1,500,000 records that describe 260000 individuals over seven generations. The CMGPD-LN is accordingly an important resource for the study of historical demography, sociology, economics, and other fields.

The CMGPD-LN and associated English-language documentation are already available for download at ICPSR, following a free registration. Please visit the website: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/cmgpd

China Multigenerational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng (CMGPD-SC)

The CMGPD-SC covers communities of recent settlers in Shuangcheng, Heilongjiang in the last half of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth. It contains 1.35 million records that describe 100,000 people. The registers cover descendants of urban migrants from Beijing and rural migrants from neighboring areas in northeast China who came to the area in the first half of the nineteenth century as part of a government organized effort to settle this largely vacant frontier region. One of the distinguishing features of this dataset is the availability of linked, individual-level landholding records for several points in time. The data also include a rich array of other indicators of household and family context and socioeconomic status. We anticipate formal public release of the dataset via ICPSR in 2013 or 2014. We will provide participants in the summer class with access to drafts of the release and documentation.

Topics to be Covered in Class

1. Review of relevant research in related topics in social demography

2. Results on topics in social and family demography from CMGPD-LN 
3. Advanced techniques in STATA for the management and analysis of the CMGPD-LN data.  
4. Preview of the CMGPD-SC
Information
Dates
July 6, 2012 to July 20, 2012
Location
Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Humanities (SJTU Minhang Campus, Shanghai)
Application deadline
April 25, 2012 (see link below for application)
Application procedure
Please send your personal statement and application form as attachments to chinanortheast@gmail.com.  We will have an English language application form available soon.
Applications from faculty and graduate students are welcome.  Applications from undergraduates may be considered if they have already been accepted into a graduate program beginning fall 2012.  Students should already be able to conduct basic operations in STATA, and should also have completed a basic course in linear regression.

We anticipate being able to accommodate 25 students. 
Students will be offered free housing in dormitories at SJTU.  Students who want other accommodations will have to arrange them on their own and pay for them.  Students should bring their own computer, with STATA or another statistical package already installed.  Students already familiar with other statistical packages may use them, but we will only be able to provide support to student using STATA.  Students are responsible for travel and local expenses.
Links

Chinese language announcement of our 2012 CMGPD summer course at SJTU

We’ve pretty much finalized the text of our announcement for our summer short course at SJTU this July.  I’ll produce an English language version pretty soon and post it.  This summer I will probably lecture in English so we encourage applications from non-Chinese speakers.               
上海交通大学中国东北历史与社会研究中心

清代辽宁多代人口数据库暨社会人口学研究暑期学校(第二期)
招生信息

上海交通大学中国东北历史与社会研究中心是上海交通大学人文学院与香港科技大学人文与社会科学学院合作建立的研究机构。中心第二期暑期学校于201276日-720日开课。课程以社会人口学与清代辽宁多代人口数据库的利用为核心,特聘香港科技大学人文社会科学院院长李中清(James Lee教授为课程顾问,加州大学(洛杉矶)社会学系康文林(Cameron Campbell教授主讲,全英文授课。
【数据库简介】
     1清代辽宁多代人口数据库(CMGPD-LN

 清代辽宁多代人口数据库(China Multi-Generational Panel Dataset – Liaoning),是研究中国家庭与社会人口史的重要数据库,亦可以为人口行为、亲属与社会分层的过程研究,提供庞大的数据支持。数据库适合任何社会科学统计软件进行基本的统计分析。
 数据库原始资料,来源于保存在辽宁档案馆的盛京内务府户口册,是三年一次的人口登记记录,约有3600册。我们以盛京内务府的部分户口册为基础,建立规模庞大的辽宁多代人口数据库(17491909)。目前,这个数据库已经录入31种户口册,总人数约达26万,有150万个记录,160年连续人口数据,成为历史人口学、社会学、经济学等多学科交叉研究的宝贵资源。
辽宁多代人口数据库(CMGPD-LN)的英文版,已经在美国密歇根大学ICPSR数据中心向世界免费开放,注册后可免费下载,详见网址www.icpsr.umich.edu/cmgpd

2、清代双城多代人口数据库(CMGPD-SC

中国清代双城多代人口数据库(China Multi-Generational Panel Dataset – Shuangcheng)是李中清与康文林工作组建立的中国清代及民国初年人口数据库,包含10万余人的近135万条记录。本数据库的原始资料为清代吉林将军双城堡旗人户口册,详细追踪记录了京旗、屯丁和浮丁三类旗人的人口和家户土地持有数量信息,是连续的人口与社会经济动态信息,为历史学、人口学、经济学等各项研究提供了珍贵的资料。为促进学术交流,数据库准备近期向世界开放。
【暑期学校主要课程内容】
   1、中外学术界对于社会人口学的已有研究及论争
   2、清代辽宁多代人口数据库研究与利用
   3、简介清代双城多代人口数据库  
正式开课时间 201276日—720
暑期学校地点:  上海交通大学人文学院
报名结束时间:  2012425日(请附个人简介与申请表)
学习条件:      提供免费学生宿舍住宿、学习资料;请自备电脑(推
                荐安装STATA等统计软件)。
报名方式:      请将您的个人简介与申请表,发送到chinanortheast@gmail.com
报名资格      熟悉STATA等统计软件,掌握回归分析等方法者等优先考虑。
学员名额      25

2012年中国清代辽宁人口数据库及社会人口学研究暑期学校(第二期)招生消息

Announcement of 2012 CMGPD-LN Summer Course at SJTU

We’ve begun making our detailed plans for the 2012 CMGPD-LN Summer Course at Shanghai Jiaotong University.  The Chinese-language announcement is available at our SJTU Center website, via this link: http://ishnc.sjtu.edu.cn//do/bencandy.php?fid=43&id=637.  It will be July 6 to July 20.  Since there may be non-Chinese speaking participants this year, I will probably lecture in English.  The goal of the course is to introduce participants to management and analysis of the CMGPD-LN data, with special attention to using STATA to transform the data and create new variables as needed for different analyses.

New paper on descent groups and inequality in Chinese society

James Lee and I just published a paper in the newly retitled Chinese Sociological Review examining the contribution of descent group membership to inequality between individuals in rural northeast China, and measuring continuity in the statuses of descent groups from the Qing to the present. We used linked contemporary retrospective survey data linked to historical household registers. We found that even after differences between households and villages were accounted for, there were pronounced differences in socioeconomic outcomes for individuals according to descent group. For marriage and socioeconomic attainment, differences in outcomes between descent groups in the same village were as large or larger than differences between villages.

Here is the reference:

Campbell, Cameron and James Z. Lee. 2011. “Kinship and the Long-Term Persistence of Inequality in Liaoning, China, 1749-2005.” Chinese Sociological Review. 44(1):71-104.

And here is a LINK. You’ll probably need an institutional subscription to get hold of the actual paper.

Here I will try to provide some intuition about why the work is novel and interesting, in the hope of persuading you to find the actual paper, read it, and cite it.

We all know from decades of qualitative research by anthropologists and historians that descent groups are an important unit of social organization in Chinese society. Results from fieldwork and other qualitative research suggests that descent group membership should have been an important source of inequality between individuals in Chinese society, in that individual outcomes were influenced heavily not only by the household into which they were born, but by the descent group into which they were born. In other words, otherwise identical individuals might have very different outcomes according to whether they were born into a high-status descent group or a low-status one. This is a point that is either explicit or implicit in a variety of works, for example by historians such as Robert Hymes, and anthropologists such as Maurice Freedman.

Oddly, quantitative studies of stratification and inequality in Chinese society don’t incorporate these qualitative insights into the importance of large kin groups in Chinese society. Quantitative studies of the determinants of individual life outcomes in China tend to follow models developed in the course of studying Western societies. Such models tend to emphasize the roles of macro-level differences in socioeconomic outcomes according to membership in categories defined by race, ethnicity, gender, nativity, and so forth, or micro-level differences according to individual and parental characteristics. While recent work by Don Treiman, Wang Feng, Wu Xiaogang, Xie Yu and others recognizes the role played by hukou status, danwei affiliation, and other distinctive features of contemporary Chinese society, there really isn’t much direct consideration of the role of larger kin groups.

Accordingly, our paper is a first stab at accounting for the role of descent groups in structuring inequality between individuals. We have retrospective survey data from selected villages in rural Liaoning that we have linked to household register data in the China Multigenerational Panel Dataset-Liaoning (CMGPD-LN). One of the key features of the CMGPD-LN is that it allows for reconstruction of descent groups across multiple generations through automated linking. Perhaps more importantly, the CMGPD-LN is now available for download by anyone who would like to extend upon our work.

For the analysis, we estimate multi-level random-effects models to measure the relative importance of differences between villages, descent groups, and households in accounting for differences in the socioeconomic and demographic outcomes of individuals. We also rank descent groups in the Qing and the last half of the twentieth century according to their success in attaining local official positions, and then calculate correlations in those ranks as indices of the continuity of status. The long and short of it is that there are pronounced differences between descent groups, and substantial continuity in the relative statuses of descent groups.

The question, of course, is why? We are still pondering this. So far our explanations for the importance of descent groups and the continuity of their statuses has revolved around the idea that especially before public education became universal, descent groups were a primary locus within individuals learned norms, behaviors, values, orientations and so forth. In other words, intangibles such as knowledge and skills circulated within descent groups and were passed down from one generation to the other. We further speculate that the continuity we observed from the Qing to the late twentieth century reflected the resilience of these intangibles to efforts at social leveling that focused on the redistribution of material goods.