Events & Seminars

Symposium
Literature and Philosophy International Symposium 文學與哲學國際研討會

19 June 2017 - Day 1 Keynote Speech: Lianke YAN 閻連科 Panel 1: On Yan Lianke Chair: Shengqing WU 1. Letty CHEN: The Moral Burden of Bearing Witness to History 2. Shuang SHEN: Narrative, Action, and the Political: Reading Yan Lianke’s Four Books in Light of Hannah Arendt’s Political Philosophy 3. 梁 鴻: 輪回與歷史的開啟——論《受活》的時間 Discussion Break Panel 2: On other Contemporary Chinese Writers Chair: Christopher LUPKE 4. Todd FOLEY: Boredom, Love & Art in Wang Anyi's I Love Bill 5. 陳 朗: 佛陀的歸來: 論史鐵生的「混同之教」 6. 劉劍梅: 高行健作品中的女性與道 Discussion Lunch Panel 3: On Thoughts and Religion Chair: Letty CHEN 7. Christopher LUPKE: The Everyday Practice of Philosophy in Modern Chinese Literature: Aporias in the Discourse on Ritual and Filiality 8. Christopher REA: The Book of Swindles in Chinese literary history 9. 戴 勁: <創世記>第 3 章第 1-19 節的三種敘事分析與詮釋 10. 林 崗: 文學與思想關係的歷史觀察 Discussion Break Panel 4: On Modern Chinese Literature Chair: Christopher REA 11. 郜元寶: 科學·神思宗·心·文學——青年鲁迅思想四题議 12. Carlos Yu-Kai LIN: Baihua as an Element: Toward a New Methodology of Studying May Fourth Literary Discourses 13. 楊揚: 《小說月報》与 1920 年代中國文學 14. Xiaolu MA: Humanism or Individualism: Tolstoy’s Religious Humanism and the Divergence Between the Zhou Brothers Discussion Dinner 20 June 2017 - Day 2 Panel 5: On Evolution and the Posthuman Chair: 郜元寶 15. 戴錦華: 人類之維:AI 元年與後人類主義 16. Mingwei SONG: Science Fiction and the Posthuman 17. 張清華: 進步論的終結與當代文學的復興 Discussion Break Panel 6: On the Novel and Contemporary Predicament Chair:戴錦華 18. 陳建華: 當思想遭遇小說--讀吳亮《朝霞》 19. 樊 星: 當代哲理小說與當代文化精神 20. 王 宇: 三仙姑與“他者主體性”——重讀趙樹理《小二黑结婚》 21. 宋紅嶺: 啟蒙話語的當代困境與重構可能 Discussion Lunch Panel 7: On History and Heritage Chair: 黃心村 22. Ping FU: Dating national civilizations in the globalized time and space 23. Kenny NG: The Fear of Disappearance: Reading Ye Si with HKSAR Photography and Cinema 24. Daisy DU: Animating the Lyrical and the Philosophical in Political Time: On Ink-painting Animated Film The Herd Boy’s Flute (1964 Discussion Break Panel 8: On Politics Chair: 楊 揚 25. 李躍力: 無政府主義與“革命文學”的“羅曼蒂克” 26. 劉曉麗: “世界即刑具——偽滿洲國作家爵青的哲學思考與文學創作” 27. 王 堯: 《九级浪》:“躲避崇高”的濫觴之作 Discussion Break Panel 9: Continuity and Rupture Chair:王 堯 28. 季 進: 錢鍾書與解構主義哲學 29. Liang LUO: Making Sense of the Snake Women as Literature, History, and Philosophy 30. Carlos ROJAS: Reflections on Translation Discussion Dinner

Date
June 19, 2017 (Monday) - June 20, 2017 (Tuesday)
Time
09:00am - 6:00pm
Venue
Mr and Mrs Lee Siu Lun Lecture Theater (LTK) 李兆麟伉儷演講廳
Sponsor
Tin Ka Ping Foundation, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study, Office of the Dean of Humanities & Social Science, Division of Humanities

Seminar
106th Lecture -- Is Human Nature Evil in the Xunzi? [第一百零六講] 荀子的性"惡"論

摘要: 在荀子的思想中,最廣為人熟悉的乃是其性惡論。荀子謂:「人之性惡,其善者偽也」,認為人天生並非性善,而必須透過學習才能為善。因此,荀子的性惡論與孟子的性善論經常被視為先秦人性論的兩個極端。是次講座將分析兩者的分歧,並嘗試為荀子的人性論作辯解。 Bio: Angel O K TING is a lecturer in College of International Education at Hong Kong Baptist University. She graduated from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2013. Her research interests include moral psychology, ethics, comparative philosophy, early Confucianism and Zhuangzi.

Speaker(s)
Dr. Angel O K Ting (丁安祺博士)
Date
June 18, 2017 (Sunday)
Time
3:00pm - 5:00pm
Venue
Lecture Hall, G/F, Hong Kong Museum of History
Language
Cantonese (以廣東話主講)
Sponsor
Hong Kong Museum of History

Seminar
The Structure of Protest Cycles: Contagion and Cohesion in South Korea’s Democracy Movement

Abstract Although the concept of protest cycles has received much attention in the social movements literature, its empirical operationalization remains relatively crude compared to the rich theoretical discussion. We expand the application of the concept of protest cycles by reimagining movements as a population of interlinked protests and identifying events that play critical roles in historical outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of considering protest cycles as protest event networks with a novel dataset on South Korea’s democracy movement. In our conceptualization protest events play the role of network nodes and links are identified based on protesters citing prior events as sources of inspiration for mobilizing. Appropriating strategies for network analysis we ascertain the types of events that were more likely to motivate subsequent protests and bridge otherwise disconnected events. Results suggest that protests that raised systemic versus local issues, targeted political versus economic actors, used disruptive tactics, were repressed by state authorities, involved well-known activist leaders, and were sponsored by formal social movement organizations were more likely to be central events. By identifying the characteristics of events that contribute to the probability of protest contagion and movement cohesion, our novel approach to analyzing protest cycles sheds new light on dominant themes in social movement research. Bio Paul Y. Chang is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Harvard University. He is the author of Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement, 1970-1979 (Stanford University Press 2015) and co-editor of South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society (Routledge 2011). Chang’s research on social and political change in South Korea has appeared in several disciplinary and area studies journals including Social Forces, Mobilization, and the Journal of Korean Studies. His current project explores the emergence of non-traditional family structures in South Korea, including single-parent households, single-person households, and multicultural families.

Speaker(s)
Prof. Paul Y. Chang
Harvard University
Date
June 16, 2017 (Friday)
Time
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Venue
Room 3301 (Lifts 17-18) Academic Building, HKUST

Seminar
Using a Probabilistic Model to Assist Merging of Large-scale Administrative Records

Abstract Since most social science research relies upon multiple data sources, merging data sets is an essential part of workflow. In many situations, however, a unique identifier that unambiguously link records is unavailable and data sets may contain missing and inaccurate information. These problems are severe especially when merging large-scale administrative records. The existing algorithms to automate the merging process do not scale, yield many fewer matches, and require arbitrary decisions by researchers. In this paper, we develop a fast algorithm to implement the canonical probabilistic model of record linkage. The proposed methodology can efficiently handle millions of observations while accounting for missing data, incorporating auxiliary information, and adjusting for uncertainty about merging. We conduct comprehensive simulation studies to evaluate the performance of our algorithm in realistic scenarios. We also apply our methodology to merge the campaign contribution data, the Cooperative Congressional Election Study data, and the nationwide voter file. Bio Kosuke Imai is Professor in the Department of Politics and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning at Princeton University. At Princeton, he is the founding director of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning and an executive committee member of the Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science (Q-APS). Outside of Princeton, Imai is currently serving as the Vice President and the President-elect of the Society for Political Methodology. He is also Professor of Visiting Status in the Faculty of Law and Graduate Schools of Law and Politics at The University of Tokyo. After obtaining a B.A. in Liberal Arts from the University of Tokyo (1998), Imai received an A.M. in Statistics (2002) and a Ph.D. in political science (2003) from Harvard University. Imai's research area is political methodology and more generally applied statistics in the social sciences. He has extensively worked on the development and applications of statistical methods for causal inference with experimental and observational data. Other areas of his methodological research are survey methodology and computational algorithms for data-intensive social science research. His substantive applications range from the randomized evaluation of Mexican universal health insurance program to the study of public opinion and insurgent violence in Afghanistan. Imai is the author of Quantitative Social Science: An Introduction (Princeton University Press, 2017). He has published more than fifty peer-refereed journal articles in political science, statistics, and other fields, and authored over ten open-source software packages. He has won several awards including the Miyake Award (2006), the Warren Miller Prize (2008), the Pi Sigma Alpha Award (2013), the Stanley Kelley, Jr. Teaching Award (2013), the Statistical Software Award (2015), and is the inaugural recipient of Society of Political Methodology's Emerging Scholar Award (2011). Imai's research has been supported by several National Science Foundation grants as well as grants from other agencies.

Speaker(s)
Prof Kosuke Imai
Princeton University
Date
June 14, 2017 (Wednesday)
Time
12:00 noon - 1:30 pm
Venue
Room 3301 (Lifts 17-18) Academic Building, HKUST

Seminar
Chinese Roads in India: The Effect of Transport Infrastructure on Economic Development

Abstract India and China followed different strategies in the design of their recent highway network projects. India focused on connecting the four largest economic centers of the country, while China had the explicit strategy of connecting intermediate-sized cities. The two countries also experienced different regional development patterns, with stronger convergence in China. This paper analyzes the aggregate and distributional effects of transport infrastructure in India based on a general equilibrium trade framework. I compare the effects of a recent highway project that improved the connections between Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai, and Mumbai to a counterfactual Indian highway network that mimics the Chinese strategy of connecting intermediate-sized cities. The counterfactual network is designed to approximately maximize net income based on the general equilibrium framework and road construction costs. I use satellite data on night lights to estimate the model at the level of Indian districts. The results suggest that the actual network led to large aggregate gains but unequal effects across regions. The income-maximizing counterfactual network is substantially larger than the actual Indian network, would imply further aggregate gains, and would benefit the lagging regions of India. Bio Simon Alder is Assistant Professor of Economics and Kaufman Family Global Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests are growth and development, trade, macroeconomics, and political economy. Simon Alder received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Zurich and he joined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2014. His work has appeared in the Journal of Economic Growth.

Speaker(s)
Prof Simon Alder
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Date
June 12, 2017 (Monday)
Time
12:00 noon - 1:30 pm
Venue
Room 3301 (Lifts 17-18) Academic Building, HKUST